13 Everyday Habits That Are Aging You

July 21st, 2014

Are you aging too quickly? Get expert tips on common mistakes and learn how to reverse the process.

Anti-aging tips

by Linda Melone

Are you aging faster than your years? If you don’t like what you see in the mirror, it may be time to evaluate some of your daily routines. The foods you eat and even the way you sleep can add years to your face and may shorten your lifespan. Here, experts discuss the most common age-accelerating habits and ways to reverse the process.

1. You multitask

If your to-do list never seems to get any shorter, the stress from your hectic life may be taxing your body. “People think multitasking is good, but you don’t actually get anything done—you just create more stress,” says Raymond Casciari, MD, chief medical officer of St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif. Several studies show that chronic stress triggers the release of free radicals, the unstable molecules that damage cells and are responsible for aging. Instead of trying to do it all, Dr. Casciari suggests concentrating on one task at a time and only moving on once you finish it.

2.You rarely pass up dessert

Aside from adding excess pounds to your body, your sweet tooth may also be adding years to your face. “Internally, sugar molecules attach themselves to protein fibers in each of our cells,” says Susan Stuart, MD, a San Diego, Calif. board-certified dermatologist. This damaging process, known as glycation, can result in a loss of radiance, dark circles under the eyes, loss of tone, puffiness, an increase in fine lines and wrinkles and a loss of facial contours and increased pore size. Pass on the sugary treats if you want to preserve your youthful glow.

3. You get by on fewer than five hours sleep a night

Skimping on sleep not only results in dark bags under the eyes—it has also been linked to a shorter lifespan, says Dr. Casciari, who founded a sleep laboratory at St. Joseph’s Hospital. “Sleeping within the seven-hour range is optimal,” he says. Get to bed earlier if you have the symptoms of sleep deprivation, which include a lack of daytime energy, mental sluggishness, attention problems, or weight gain, Dr. Casciari says. Here are seven tips for the best sleep ever.

4. You love a good TV marathon

Binge-watching the latest season of House of Cards is one thing; regularly gluing yourself to the TV is another. In a British Journal of Sports Medicine study of about 11,000 Australians ages 25 and older, researchers found that for every hour of television watched, adults cut their life expectancy by 22 minutes. What’s more, people who spent an average of six hours a day watching TV lived five years less than their non-viewing counterparts. “This effect is more about sitting and being inactive than the TV watching,” says Dr. Casciari. “When you sit for more than 30 minutes your body begins to deposit sugar into your cells, which makes it much more likely you’ll be overweight as well.” Whether you’re watching TV or at your desk, get up every 30 minutes to walk around, says Dr. Casciari.

5. You spend most of the day sitting

The dangers of a sedentary lifestyle are well-documented: People who spend most of their days parked in a chair are at increased risk for kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, not to mention obesity.

Naturally, exercising regularly helps to prevent  these health issues and keeps you living longer, according to a study from the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Study participants who exercised 150 minutes or more a week lived 10 to 13 years longer than the inactive bunch

6. You don’t use eye cream

Even a no-fuss skincare routine needs to include a good eye cream to keep aging wrinkles at bay. Skin around the eyes is thinner than the skin on the rest of your face and shows age faster, says Dr. Stuart. Keeping the eye area moisturized can take years off your face. “Eye creams that are most effective contain Retin A, a form of vitamin A,” says Dr. Stuart. Other important factors include emollients and moisturizers that trap moisture, antioxidants, hyaluronic acid, and vitamin C. “These promote formation of collagen and elastin to tighten the skin and reduce fine lines around the eyes,” Dr. Stuart says.

7. You use sunscreen, but only on vacation

Running errands, driving, and walking back and forth to the mailbox may do more damage to your skin than spending a day at the beach if you do it sans sunblock, says Sarah L. Taylor, MD, associate professor of dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. “The number-one cause of nearly every sign of premature aging on the human face is ultraviolet exposure,” Dr. Taylor says. “UV light is present even when it’s cloudy or raining.” Protect your skin by wearing sunblock any time you go outdoors. Dr. Taylor recommends an SPF between 30 and 50 for daily use. You should also follow these golden rules of sun protection.

8. You wear too much makeup

Metallic blue eye shadow aside, excess makeup can age you in less obvious ways, too, says Dr. Stuart. “Wearing excessive amounts of makeup, especially oil based products, can clog your skin pores and cause outbreaks.” In addition, overusing skin products with fragrances, irritating chemicals, and alcohol agents may dry out the skin by removing its natural oils, which causes premature lines and wrinkles. Consult with your dermatologist for guidance, and avoid these 18 beauty mistakes that age you.

9. You sleep with your face in the pillow

Sleeping on your stomach or on your side with your face smashed into the pillow can create wrinkles and accelerate aging. “The connective tissue and collagen in your face becomes weaker and less supportive with age,” says James C. Marotta, MD, a board-certified facial plastic surgeon and skincare expert. “So when you sleep on the same side of your face night after night, your skin won’t smooth out or spring back as quickly as it did when you were young.” Those crease lines from your pillow can become permanent. Sleep on your back or invest in a satin pillowcase to keep skin smooth

10. You keep your home toasty warm

When it’s a snowy mess outside, it’s tempting to crank up the heat indoors. But whether you light up the fireplace or turn up the thermostat, both suck moisture out of the air, says Dr. Marotta. “This can lead to dry, inflamed skin, which over time has aging effects.” Investing in a humidifier helps counteract the dry air  (40 to 60% humidity is optimal) and can free your skin from itching, scratching, and flaking. Alternatively, Dr. Marotta recommends placing a wet towel over a radiator or a bowl of cold water in the room as a way to add back some of the lost moisture.

11. You sip drinks through a straw

Drinking dark-colored beverages through a straw can prevent stains on your teeth, but just as squinting can eventually cause wrinkles to form around your eyes, pursing your lips can also bring about premature wrinkles around the mouth. “This also occurs when smoking cigarettes,” says Janet Prystowsky, MD, a board-certified dermatologist in New York. Pour your bottled beverages into a drinking glass to avoid puckering up.

 

12. You cut out all fat from your diet

Some fat is necessary for maintaining a youthful feeling and appearance, says Franci Cohen, a certified nutritionist and exercise physiologist from Brooklyn, NY. “Heart-healthy omega 3 fatty acids found in oily fish (such as salmon and mackerel) and certain nuts (such as walnuts and flax seeds) keep skin supple and plump, thereby preventing wrinkles, and they boost both heart and brain health as well,” she says. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends including fish in your meals at least twice a week.

13. You slouch

Slumping in front of a keyboard for hours on end can cause your spine to form an unattractive and potentially harmful hunched posture over time, says Jeremy Smith, MD, orthopedic spine surgeon at Hoag Orthopedic Institute in Irvine, Calif. “The spine has a well-balanced S-shaped curvature in order to stabilize and support us,” Dr. Smith says.  “Poor posture or slouching deviates the spine from this normal alignment, and as a result, the muscles, disks and bones become abnormally stressed.” Pain and fatigue often follow, and possibly spinal degeneration and a permanent deformity. Practice good posture by checking it throughout the day: ear, shoulder, and hip should form a straight line when seated



Can your face reveal how long you’ll live? New technology may provide the answer.

July 7th, 2014

Imagine that an insurance underwriter comes to your house and, along with noting your weight and blood pressure, snaps a photo of your face. And that those wrinkles, mottled spots and saggy parts, when fed into a computer, could estimate how long you will live.

Facial recognition technology, long used to search for criminals and to guess how a missing child might look as an adult, may soon become personal. A group of scientists is working on a system that would analyze an individual’s prospects based on how his or her face has aged.
“We know in the field of aging that some people tend to senesce, or grow older, more rapidly than others, and some more slowly,” said Jay Olshansky, a biodemographer at the University of Illinois at Chicago who came up with the idea. “And we also know that the children of people who senesce more slowly tend to live longer than other people.”
The research is still in its early stages, but the idea of using facial recognition technology has prompted interest from insurance company executives who see potential for using it in determining premiums, Olshansky said. There’s also a potential benefit for individuals: The technology might prod them to change their health habits before it’s too late.
The technology involves using a computer to scan a photograph of a face for signs of aging. Factoring in the subject’s race, gender, education level and smoking history — all known to affect longevity prospects — it would analyze each section of cheek, eye, brow, mouth and jowl looking for shading variations that signal lines, dark spots, drooping and other age-related changes that might indicate how the person is doing compared with others of the same age and background.
As the United States skews increasingly older, research into extending life span and, in particular, increasing the number of healthy years is a boom topic for public and private entities.
Google last fall announced Calico, a new enterprise focusing on aging and associated diseases, for which it has been recruiting top scientists; it has not revealed details of its plans or how much it is investing. Another organization, Human Longevity Inc., headed by the well-known genomics researcher Craig Venter, launched this spring with plans to build a database of human DNA sequencing to tackle diseases of aging; it raised $70 million in an initial round of funding.
And the National Institutes of Health recently launched an unprecedented collaborative initiative across 20 of its 27 specialized institutes to address aging and longevity. National Institute on Aging director Richard Hodes said the NIH would also like to work on the topic with some of the emerging organizations.

A new system uses a complicated algorithm and a growing database of faces to assess how old parts of a person’s face appear to be. Researchers behind the site hope to one day link the appearance of aging to longevity. Here’s what the computer said about two Post reporters.
The economic and social implications could be staggering. Not only will living to 100 become more common one day, longevity experts say, but the quality of life in the final decades might also be drastically improved, reducing the burdens imposed by an aging population.
Increasing life expectancy by 2.2 years by slowing aging would save $7.1 trillion in disability and entitlement programs over 50 years, according to a paper in Health Affairs co-authored by Olshansky, who is also a research associate at the University of Chicago’s Center on Aging.
Longevity scientists say the key to extending healthy life lies in focusing on aging itself rather than on aging-related diseases. Even minor progress in slowing the aging process would be more groundbreaking than major progress that tackles just one illness, they say.
In fact, drugs already in use for some age-related diseases may turn out to work because they are delaying aging overall.
“We may be at the beginning of a time when drugs approved for diabetes or macular degeneration are actually working because they are delaying the onset of aging,” said Dan Perry, founder of the Alliance for Aging Research, a Washington-based advocacy group.
And while it is not yet clear whether humans will one day live 150 years, as some have predicted, scientists are optimistic that the number of years of healthy life — or “health span” — of humans can be significantly increased and the infirmities associated with aging reduced.
“Aging is not such a deep part of our biology that it can’t be changed,” said Steven Austad, chair of the biology department at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “All this stuff seemed like science fiction a few years ago, but now we have it, at least in mice.”
A personal approach
The idea for the facial recognition project came to Olshansky a couple of years ago during dinner with an insurance underwriter . “He was complaining that he had a very short time to assess people’s survival prospects” and that the methods used to do it were too blunt, Olshansky said.
Olshansky, whose work includes exploring the limits to human longevity, slowing aging and studying health and public-policy implications of individual and population aging, knew that people who live longer generally look younger than other people of their age. He wondered whether that knowledge could translate into something more scientific.
He contacted Karl Ricanek, a professor of computer science at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, who has worked on facial recognition technology for the National Security Agency, the CIA, and the FBI; along with a biostatistician and other computer scientists, they developed a program to analyze photographs of faces.
They have launched a Web site inviting anyone in the world to submit a photo. The database they are developing, called Face My Age, is expected to deliver increasingly more accurate assessments and predictions as more people participate. The researchers are hoping for large numbers of people — at least 10,000 or 20,000, but preferably more — to submit photos and basic biographical information in exchange for feedback on how quickly they are aging and what this means for their longevity prospects. The person in the photo cannot smile or have makeup on, and must reveal if he or she has had plastic surgery.

Staff writer Tara Bahrampour is shown here in an actual photograph taken at her current age of 47. The images at later ages were produced using computer technology developed by researchers at Face Aging Group at the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. (The Washington Post)
The technique is more personalized than the current approach to face aging.
“The technology that is out there utilizes group norms, so they can artificially age you,” Ricanek said. “But . . . the lines they paint on your face are actually the same as the lines they paint on my face, [whereas] the ones we’re using are individual.”
Initially the site will give users only  one number — their apparent age — but as it becomes more refined, it should be able to assign perceived ages to different parts of the face, Olshansky said.
“Imagine taking your iPhone and snapping a selfie and putting it into our Web site and discovering that your eyes are that of a 50-year-old, your lips are that of a 70-year-old, your cheeks are that of a 50-year-old,” he said.
The algorithms work differently for people of different genders and ethnic groups, Ricanek said. For example, the skin of lighter-complected individuals, which has less melanin, tends to age more as a result of sun exposure than the skin of people with darker complexions. Women’s faces tend to age more quickly than men’s because of different distributions of fat and blood vessels.

Staff writer Robert Samuels is shown here in an actual photograph taken at his current age 29. The images at later ages were produced using computer technology developed by researchers at Face Aging Group at the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. (The Washington Post)
Wait and see
It won’t be clear how well the technology works until enough participants die and the researchers can see how good their estimates were. But the project recently got a boost when it gained access to several thousand photos taken years ago of people, some of whom have subsequently died; knowing the date of death for so many will allow the Web site to start providing users with even more reliable life span estimates in the next 12 to 18 months, Olshansky said.
If successful, it could be used not only by insurance companies but also by health advocates, financial institutions and other scientists.
The concept is intriguing — if it works, said Nir Barzilai, director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. But he said it is not clear whether skin appearance alone can reveal deeper signs of aging.
“You really want to see if the skin biomarker is associated with other disease,” he said.
Barzilai, who works with centenarians, said he plans to submit photos of some of his subjects, ages 60 to 116, to the database.
James Kirkland, director of the Kogod Center on Aging at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said that more important than estimating a person’s life span would be predicting  his or her functional state, which Ricanek and Olshansky’s database will not do. But like many discoveries that end up contributing to science in unexpected ways, “it could be part of a pipeline that eventually results in something,” he said.
Potential for bias
Ethical and practical concerns may also arise, said Leonard Fleck, a professor of philosophy and medical ethics at Michigan State University.
Even if it can predict life span, the analysis might not be able to predict a person’s need for long-term care, he said. And it could open the door for discrimination.
“If at age 40 if there were something about your face saying you’re not likely to make it past 60, an employer could say, ‘Oh, I’m not willing to promote you to some position of importance because it’s not likely to be a good investment,’ ” Fleck said.
And people who look younger than their years do not always last long, said Mark Collins, president of the California-based Glenn Foundation, which funds aging research. “Sometimes people who look very healthy drop dead in the middle of the track, while others who look crinkled are still running at age 80,” he said.
Olshansky conceded that even if face aging is found to correlate with longevity, there will be outliers who don’t fit the general pattern.
“The longest-lived person in the world smoked for 100 years,” he said, adding that U.S. presidents, too, tend to be outliers, aging visibly faster in office but generally living longer than average.
However, he said, for the most part a face is a window onto a person’s overall health.
“The face picks up a lot of risk factors for health, such as tobacco smoking (wrinkles around the mouth); excessive alcohol consumption (larger nose); and excessive exposure to the sun (early brown spots and wrinkling) as well as stress,” he said in an e-mail.
At the very least, learning the results of one’s face-age analysis may nudge participants to try to extend their healthy life spans by adopting good habits.
“If someone came to you and said that your life expectancy, for example, is five years from now, you would think pretty hard and long about what’s going on in your life,” Ricanek said. “It can make us wake up and change some of the things that we’re doing — maybe we’re stressing out too much about our job; maybe we need to make different lifestyle decisions. I would like to shake people up.”


Top 5 reasons why you are losing volume!

June 25th, 2014

We all have varying degrees of fat in our faces and a multitude of factors can cause changes to these fatty compartments. “Volume loss occurs because of gradual changes in the appearance of the fat,” says Littleton, CO, facial plastic surgeon Brent Smith, MD. “There is a loss both superficially and at a deeper level that comes along with aging.”

1. Yo-Yo Dieting And Extreme Exercising
Keeping fat off your body is no easy task since the body can’t be told where to lose weight from and where to keep it. So even if you want to “spot-treat” a specific part of the body, you may end up reducing the amount of fat in your face as well. “The ups and downs of recurrent dieting cause a stretching of the ligaments that support the tissues of the face. This can result in a loss of elasticity and volume, which promotes an aging effect,” says Dr. Smith. A lack of facial fullness is often seen in avid exercisers and runners because they are consistently burning off a high number of calories—volume loss is often evident even if they are at a healthy weight. “They may feel healthy, but they often look older than they really are,” says La Jolla, CA, plastic surgeon Robert Singer, MD.

2. Excessive Sun Exposure
Although fat loss is not directly dependent on UV rays, it is important to protect your skin from the sun. “If you don’t wear SPF daily, the sun will accelerate the breakdown of collagen and elastin in the skin. When collagen and elastin levels are of poor quality, the condition of the skin is affected and the loss of fat can be accentuated,” says New York plastic surgeon Alan Matarasso, MD.

3. Hormonal Changes
Female hormones, namely estrogen, are partially responsible for changes in the amount and quality of fat. As hormone levels begin to dip, fat can start to thin out.

4. Too Thin Of A Frame
It is possible to be too skinny. When that’s the case, the aging process will become even more of your foe than your friend. The reason: A naturally thin face has little natural fat to begin with and over time the inherent amounts of fat begin to diminish, causing an extremely haggard look.

5. Receding Bones
With age, we naturally lose bone mass in the face. The muscles also begin to atrophy to some degree. These changes alter the underlying structure of the face and can cause the cheekbones and midface to look collapsed (the effects usually don’t take hold until later in life). “It’s noticeable in the 70- to 80-year-old patient and while it’s highly variable, the majority of resorption happens around the nose and in the central face,” says Chicago plastic surgeon Julius Few, MD.



Men’s biggest body complaints, and the surgeries to treat them

June 13th, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Men may not be as open about their bodies as women, but it’s no secret that guys can have their own set of insecurities about physical appearance, especially as they enter middle age. That’s why doctors have seen an increase in the number of men seeking plastic surgery to treat their body woes over the years. Here are some of the most common complaints among men when it comes to body image, and what surgeries are available to help improve them.

The dreaded man boob
As men age, it typically becomes more difficult for them to maintain a svelte physique, even if they continue to diet and exercise. Many men develop fat around their chest, which results in the appearance of male breasts, medically known as gynecomastia. According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), anywhere from 40 to 60 percent of men suffer from this issue, which may explain why male breast reduction was one of the top five plastic surgery procedures for men in 2011, the organization reports.

This fat can be removed via liposuction or by cutting out excess glandular tissue. This procedure can take around two hours, and is typically performed on an outpatient basis. Minimal scarring around the nipple will fade over time, as will any swelling or bruising that appears in the days after surgery.

The bothersome beer belly
It’s called a beer belly because it can be caused by an intake of too many calories from alcohol, but some men develop a gut simply because of genetics. Guys who find that diet and exercise aren’t working to shrink their stomachs may want to consider liposuction to remove the excess fat.

This was the most common procedure for men last year, ASAPS reports, so it should be relatively simple to find a board-certified plastic surgeon who has experience with male patients seeking liposuction. This surgery is often combined with a tummy tuck to remove any excess, sagging skin left over following removal of fat.

The aging face
The face is another area of concern for middle-aged men, as lines and wrinkles here are impossible to hide. For men, the two most popular options to treat this issue are Botox injections and facelifts, according to ASAPS. Botox is a non-invasive treatment, but it requires multiple injections over time, as the effects are not permanent. Facelifts, on the other hand, offer permanent results, but involve more intensive surgery.


The mission of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) includes medical education, public education and patient advocacy. Plastic Surgery News Briefs are summaries of current stories found through various news and magazine outlets that relate to or mention plastic surgery and cosmetic procedures. The views expressed in these news articles do not necessarily reflect the opinions of ASAPS, but are merely published as an educational service to our members and the general public. For additional information on these subjects and other plastic surgery related topics, please go to www.surgery.org



NeoGraft Hair Restoration with NO DOWNTIME!

June 5th, 2014



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May 28th, 2014



JUST RELEASED!! 2013 Cosmetic Surgery Statistics from The ASAPS

April 4th, 2014

JUST RELEASED!
2013 Cosmetic Surgery Statistics from The American Society for Aesthetic
Plastic Surgery (ASAPS)

THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR AESTHETIC PLASTIC SURGERY REPORTS
AMERICANS SPENT LARGEST AMOUNT ON COSMETIC SURGERY SINCE THE GREAT RECESSION OF
2008

More Than 12 Billion Dollars Spent on Surgical and Nonsurgical Procedures in 2013

NEW YORK, NY (March 20, 2014) – The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) today released its complete 17th annual multi-specialty statistical data indicating a 12% overall increase in cosmetic procedures performed in the United States in 2013. More than 11 million cosmetic surgical and nonsurgical procedures were performed by board-certified plastic surgeons, dermatologists and otolaryngologists in the United States, totaling more than 12 billion dollars for the first time since the Great Recession began in 2008. Of that total, more  than 7 billion was spent on surgical procedures and more than 5 billion was spent on nonsurgical procedures.
This year, liposuction replaced breast augmentation as the most frequently performed surgical
procedure with a 16% increase and more than one billion was spent on the procedure nationwide.

Link to full press release

Download the complete statistics tables and graphs

Statistics Quick Facts
Click on the Links (If a link does not connect, please copy-and-paste the URL into your browser)

 



How does the face age?

February 12th, 2014

Q: How does the face age?

A: The changes of the face we see due to aging begin as early as the 3rd and 4th decade of our lives. The skin begins to thin, gravity pulls the face downward, loss of facial volume gives wrinkles (like a deflated ballon), laxity of the deeper dacial fat, muscle and ligaments causes sagging and isualization of discolored, sun damaged skin. This results in wrinkled foreheads, falling brows, excess eyelif skin, and heavy bags under the eyes. You look tired and sad. The cheekbones flatten, the tip of the nose droops, facial and marionette lines of the mouth deepenand you lose the jawline with squaring of the face. The chin fades with neck laxity of the muscle and skin. Please call our office regarding treatment of early aging. 239-348-4357

 

Actualy Patient- Before and After-  4 Juvederm XC Filler



Please welcome our newest member!

January 29th, 2014

Naples Cosmetic Surgery is thrilled to welcome our newest
team member, Traci Long, Physician Assistant. Traci has been a PA for 13 years.
During that time, she began a career in aesthetics in Austin, TX where she did
Botox and various fillers prior to joining our practice. Her passion for
aesthetics and attention to detail, coupled with her extensive background in
surgery, assures us that she will be able to provide our clients with the
service they have come to expect.

Traci is available for consults and injections
of Botox and other fillers.

 

 



Are you interested in an Eyelid Lift?

January 6th, 2014

Q: What is an eyelid lift?
A: An eyelid lift or blepharoplasty removes the excess skin, tightens the muscle and sculptures the underlying fat to a more youthful appearance. Many patients lose elacticity of the upper eyelid skin, causing droopy eyelids and obstruction of peripheral vision. This may require surgery of the eyelids to improve visual functions. A transconjunctival blepharoplasty hides the scar inside the eyelid and removes the fat from the baggy lower eyelid. Often overlying skin is tightened with a laser. For more information or to schedule a complementary consultation call  239-348-4357
Actualy Patient-Before/After- upper and lower eyelid procedure


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